Jack L.Vevea

Jack L. Vevea is an associate professor of quantitative psychology at the University of California, Merced.  His principal research interest is in the creation of new statistical models to address difficult problems in psychological and educational research.  He applies his expertise primarily to models related to meta-analysis and item response theory.  Jack’s undergraduate degree from UC, Berkeley was in Greek language.  He obtained his Ph.D. in educational statistics at the University of Chicago.

Education:

The University of Chicago, Department of Education. Ph.D. program in Measurement, Evaluation and Statistical Analysis (1988 to 1996).  Ph.D. awarded June, 1996.

San Francisco State University. M.S. program in Experimental Psychology  (1986 to 1988).

University of California, Berkeley.  A.B. program in Greek (1975 to 1977).  A.B. degree awarded December 1977.

San Francisco State University (1974 to 1975).  B.A. program in Classics.

Appointments:

Interim Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Dean of College One.  The University of California, Merced.

Associate Professor (July 2008 to present).
The University of California, Merced.
School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts.
Quantitative Psychology.

Associate Professor (July 2006 to June 2008).
The University of California, Santa Cruz,
Department of Psychology, Cognitive Program.
(Area head, Cognitive Psychology, July 2007-June 2008.)

Assistant Professor (July 2002 to June 2006).
The University of California, Santa Cruz,
Department of Psychology, Cognitive Program.

Assistant Professor (January 1996 to June 2002).
The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
Department of Psychology, Quantitative Program.

Instructor with special provision (July 1995 to January 1996).
The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill,
Department of Psychology, Quantitative Program.

Instructor (Fall 1991, Fall 1992).
The University of Chicago, Department of Education.
Taught Education 306, Introduction to Quantitative Inquiry.

Related Publications :

Flinspach, S.L., Scott, J.A., & Vevea, J.L. (2010).  Rare words in students’ writing as a measure of vocabulary.  In R. Jimenez, V. Risko, M. Hundley, & D. Rowe (Eds.), 59th Yearbook of the National Reading Conference (pp. 187-200).  Oak Creek, WI: National Reading Conference.

Huttenlocher, J., Waterfall, H.R., Vasilyeva, M., Vevea, J.L. & Hedges, L.V. (2010). Sources of variability in children’s language growth.  Cognitive Psychology, 61, 343-365.

Scott, J.A., Flinspach, S.L., Miller, T.F., Gage-Serio, O., & Vevea, J.L. (2009).  An analysis of reclassified English learners, English learners and native English fourth graders on assessments of receptive and productive vocabulary.  In K.M. Leander, D.W. Rowe, D.K. Dickinson, M.K. Hundley, R.T. Jimenez, V.J. Risko (Eds.), 58th Yearbook of the National Reading Conference (pp. 312-329). Oak Creek, WI: National Reading Conference.

Scott, J.A., Hoover, M., Flinspach, S.L. & Vevea, J.L. (2008). A multiple-level vocabulary assessment tool: Measuring word knowledge based on grade-level materials. In Kim, Y., Risko, V.J., Compton, D.L., Dickinson, D.K., Hundles, M.K., Jimenes, R.T., Leandor, K.M. & Rowe, D.W. (Eds.), 57th Annual Yearbook of the National Reading Conference.

Huttenlocher, J., Vasilyeva, M., Waterfall, H.R., Vevea, J.L. & Hedges, L.V. (2007).  The varieties of speech to young children.  Developmental Psychology, 43, 1062-1083.

Other Publications :

Edwards, M.C. & Vevea, J.L. (2006).  An empirical Bayes approach to subscore augmentation: How much strength can we borrow?  Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, 31, 241-259.

Vevea, J.L. & Woods, C.M. (2005).  Publication bias in research synthesis:  Sensitivity analysis using a priori weight functions.  Psychological Methods, 428-443.

Wildschut, T., Pinter, B., Vevea, J.L., Insko, C.A. & Schopler, J. (2003).  Beyond the group mind: a quantitative review of the interindividual-intergroup discontinuity effect.  Psychological Bulletin, 129, 698-722. (Winner of the 2003-2004 Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize, awarded by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Division 9 of the APA.)

Huttenlocher, J., Hedges, L.V., & Vevea, J.L. (2000).  Why do categories affect stimulus judgment?  Journal of Experimental Psychology, General, 129, 220-241.

Vevea, J.L., & Hedges, L.V. (1995).  A general linear model for estimating effect size in the presence of publication bias.  Psychometrika, 60, 419-435.

 

 

 

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